Author Archives: judo

Summary of Tuesday May 13th

May 15th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Again continuing on the gaeshi techniques of the shinmeisho no waza (see also o-soto gaeshi, o-uchi gaeshi), ko-uchi gaeshi (small inner reversal) was demonstrated, specifically this variation:

Like many other gaeshi or reversal techniques, ko-uchi gaeshi manipulates and takes advantage of uke‘s committed momentum in executing ko-uchi gari (which can be a powerful technique in its own right!).

Summary of Saturday May 10th

May 11th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Kata guruma, the shoulder wheel throw, was demonstrated. This throw was developed and introduced by Jigoro Kano into the judo curriculum after he saw the technique in a wrestling manual– kata guruma is also known as the fireman’s carry. Although kata guruma is not applicable in current competition rules, learning the technique is important for well-roundedness as kata guruma has an important niche in judo pedagogy.

Like most “wheeling” techniques like hiza guruma (knee wheel), ashi guruma (leg wheel), and o guruma (big wheel), kata guruma depends on creating a more-or-less fixed pivot point around which the receiver of the technique (uke) rotates around. In the case of kata guruma, this pivot is the shoulder. The classical way of doing kata guruma is the first technique shown in the below video:

However, while kata guruma is classified as a hand technique (te waza), the variation of kata guruma demonstrated in class was more of a side sacrifice (yoko sutemi) variation like in the videos below:

Important tips to keep in mind:

  • Close the gap. If there is distance between tori and uke, the unbalancing applied throughout the technique must first pull out the slack rather than having uke being immediately pulled off-balance as tori moves.
  • Do not change levels by bending at the waist. Like most judo throws, bending at the knees to position oneself below uke‘s centre-of-gravity allows tori to push off the ground with her/his legs and engage their whole body to complete the throw, much like how weightlifters have an erect posture to best efficiently apply lifts.
  • Similar to the second point, make sure one changes level sufficiently. If tori is not below uke‘s centre-of-gravity, the throw is much harder to complete and is hardly keeping with “maximum efficiency”. A good rule of thumb to change levels is to put one’s ear by uke‘s hip or belt.
  • Like many side sacrifice techniques, falling along one’s side rather than one’s back and following through by shoulder bridging helps refine the technique.

Ne-waza (ground technique)

Ude-hishigi waki gatame, often shortened to waki gatame, is the armpit armlock. The first variation demonstrated was a counter as uke reaches across to frame the neck or pursue a kuzure kesa gatame (modified “scarf” hold) escape. Notice how in the below video, tori clamps around uke‘s elbow with his armpit, then pulls uke onto his stomach and pulls up at the wrist to apply the armlock.

The second variation of waki gatame shown was one where uke attacks a turtled tori head on, and tori clamps the arm and sits out to apply the armlock. Notice how tori clamps above uke‘s elbow to prevent uke from bending or pulling out the arm.

Summary of Tuesday May 6th

May 7th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (1 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing on the newly accepted techniques theme (shinmeisho no waza) from o-soto gaeshi, o-uchi gaeshi (large inner reversal) was demonstrated this class. It is similar in principle to o-soto gaeshi in creating an angle to counter uke.

Summary of Saturday May 3rd

May 6th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Ne-waza (ground technique):

Two strangulation techniques, okuri eri jime (sliding collar choke) and kata ha jime (single wing choke), were demonstrated.

 

Summary of Saturday April 26th

April 27th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Utsuri goshi, the switching hip throw, was demonstrated. This is a counter hip throw that starts when tori blocks uke‘s forward throw by pushing in the hips. In competition, in response to current iteration of rules, this throw has become a popular counter option as demonstrated by the image of Kayla Harrison (USA) below.

Classically, the throw is done like in the first clip below, but it is often more effective to draw a leg back and angle one’s hips as in the second clip. Any way one does utsuri goshi, it is still a hip throw and consequently a “hip bump” is still needed to throw uke.

Summary of Tuesday April 15th

April 21st, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (2 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

O-soto gaeshi (large outer reversal), again continuing on the theme of shinmeisho no waza (newly accepted techniques), was demonstrated. This technique is also featured in an unofficial kata called go-no-sen no kata (form of counters).  In the particular variation demonstrated, tori receives uke‘s o-soto gari (large outer reap), moves his/her support leg backwards, and performs an o-soto gari at an angle.

Ron Desormeaux will be demonstrating kime no kata and goshin jutsu tomorrow, Thursday April 10th, from 7-9 PM.

Summary of Tuesday April 1st

April 2nd, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing on the theme of shinmeisho no waza (newly accepted techniques) added to the standardised 1895 gokyo no waza standard syllabus (see historical explanation), uchi mata sukashi (inner thigh throw slip) will be demonstrated next week. Because uchi mata sukashi is a counter throw that requires a fully committed uchi mata (inner thigh throw), uchi mata was reviewed this class.

Several variations of uchi-mata (inner thigh) throw was demonstrated.

“Hip version” uchi mata

“Leg version” uchi mata

Of course, since uchi mata is one of the highest percentage throws in judo competition (highlight 1, highlight 2, and 3), there are many uchi mata variations, setups, and strategies. For a glimpse at this wild beautiful world, check out Kosei Inoue’s hour long tutorial on his favourite technique (French language).

Summary of Thursday March 27th

March 29th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Advanced | Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Harai tsurikomi ashi, the sweeping-lifting-pulling foot sweep, was demonstrated.

Ne-waza (ground technique):

Primarily, hadaka jime (naked choke) from the turtle position was demonstrated.

Summary of Tuesday March 25th

March 29th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Kuchiki taoshi, the rotten wood toppling, was demonstrated. This throw’s interesting name comes from the fact that it was reintroduced as an official technique (i.e. shinmeisho no waza or newly accepted techniques) from classical jujutsu, a great source of flowery names. This technique looks much like kibisu gaeshi (ankle reversal) as demonstrated several classes ago, except the hand grabs around the thigh area rather than the heel or ankle. A good written exposition of the possibilities available with kuchiki taoshi is available here or here, but the two videos below summarise the two kuchiki variations shown.

Ne-waza (ground technique):

A way of passing the “guard”, the position where one is between the legs of another, was demonstrated. Specifically, the single leg stacking pass was demonstrated. This guard pass requires constant forward pressure both in order to pass successfully and to avoid being caught in a triangle choke (sankaku jime). Killing uke‘s hip mobility is a key point, in addition to stacking uke‘s leg into her/his face.

While not mentioned in class, the single leg stacking pass leads straight into kata te jime (single hand choke).

Featuring Recent Posts Wordpress Widget development by YD