Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

O-soto gaeshi (large outer reversal), again continuing on the theme of shinmeisho no waza (newly accepted techniques), was demonstrated. This technique is also featured in an unofficial kata called go-no-sen no kata (form of counters).  In the particular variation demonstrated, tori receives uke‘s o-soto gari (large outer reap), moves his/her support leg backwards, and performs an o-soto gari at an angle.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing on the theme of shinmeisho no waza (newly accepted techniques) added to the standardised 1895 gokyo no waza standard syllabus (see historical explanation), uchi mata sukashi (inner thigh throw slip) will be demonstrated next week. Because uchi mata sukashi is a counter throw that requires a fully committed uchi mata (inner thigh throw), uchi mata was reviewed this class.

Several variations of uchi-mata (inner thigh) throw was demonstrated.

“Hip version” uchi mata

“Leg version” uchi mata

Of course, since uchi mata is one of the highest percentage throws in judo competition (highlight 1, highlight 2, and 3), there are many uchi mata variations, setups, and strategies. For a glimpse at this wild beautiful world, check out Kosei Inoue’s hour long tutorial on his favourite technique (French language).

Summary of Thursday March 27th

March 29th, 2014 | Posted by judo in Advanced | Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Harai tsurikomi ashi, the sweeping-lifting-pulling foot sweep, was demonstrated.

Ne-waza (ground technique):

Primarily, hadaka jime (naked choke) from the turtle position was demonstrated.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Kuchiki taoshi, the rotten wood toppling, was demonstrated. This throw’s interesting name comes from the fact that it was reintroduced as an official technique (i.e. shinmeisho no waza or newly accepted techniques) from classical jujutsu, a great source of flowery names. This technique looks much like kibisu gaeshi (ankle reversal) as demonstrated several classes ago, except the hand grabs around the thigh area rather than the heel or ankle. A good written exposition of the possibilities available with kuchiki taoshi is available here or here, but the two videos below summarise the two kuchiki variations shown.

Ne-waza (ground technique):

A way of passing the “guard”, the position where one is between the legs of another, was demonstrated. Specifically, the single leg stacking pass was demonstrated. This guard pass requires constant forward pressure both in order to pass successfully and to avoid being caught in a triangle choke (sankaku jime). Killing uke‘s hip mobility is a key point, in addition to stacking uke‘s leg into her/his face.

While not mentioned in class, the single leg stacking pass leads straight into kata te jime (single hand choke).

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

The throw demonstrated in class is tsubame gaeshi, which poetically translates as the swallow reversal, in reference to the acrobatic flight of swallows. This throw is exclusively a counter to a foot sweep such as de ashi barai (forward foot sweep) or okuri ashi barai (sliding foot sweep).

While the above video shows the conventional swallow reversal, Bernard-sensei also taught another variation that sweeps the support leg of uke rather than uke‘s sweeping foot. This variation can be seen in the below video:

However, since practising tsubame gaeshi requires that uke commit to the foot sweep in order to be countered, de ashi barai was also reviewed.

Ne-waza (ground technique):

Several escapes from kami shiho gatame (upper four quarter hold) and yoko shiho gatame (side four quarter hold) were taught.

The first kami shiho gatame escape relies on mobility by pushing off your partner’s shoulders and shrimping, then turning back into uke to regain guard.

The second kami shiho gatame escape relies on threading an arm under uke‘s chin and reaching behind to grab uke‘s back. This creates space and allows for movement and further disruption of uke‘s pin and base. The two following videos show something similar to what was shown in class:

The third kami shiho gatame escape is an inverted reversal that operates by insertion of the knees and shins between tori and uke, and rolling to reverse position. Two video examples are below:

The first yoko shiho gatame escape was follows shoulder bridging, shrimping out the hips, and insertion of the nearside knee and shin to maintain distance. These principles, and other details such as blocking and framing uke‘s neck and hip with the hands, can be found in the below video:

The second yoko shiho gatame escape is initiated by shoulder bridging and turning into uke, provoking uke to push back in. Tori then reaches over and grabs the belt and pulls uke over to reverse position. Two similar videos are shown below:

The third yoko shiho gatame escape involves putting uke into sankaku jime (triangle choke).

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Morote gari, the two-handed reap, was demonstrated. It is often known as a double leg takedown in other combat sports, although technically single leg takedowns are also classified as morote gari.

Kibisu gaeshi, the ankle reversal, was also demonstrated. This is often known as an ankle pick in other combat sports.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Tai otoshi (body drop) is classified as a te-waza or hand technique. Consequently, applying an effective tai otoshi can be challenging if one applies mechanical principles from other forward throws such as hip throws (koshi waza). A good written instructional on common tai otoshi errors can be found on this blog, which touches on several topics covered in class:

Weight distribution

Nicholas Gill, Canadian Olympic medallist, demonstrates the difference between good and bad weight distribution between legs, in terms of spacing between tori and uke and concomitant ability to apply pushing power with the arms.

Posture

The posture for tai otoshi is fairly straight upwards. A bent posture tends to throw weight distribution off and/or disrupt arm action, which sometimes leads people to try wraparound sacrifice throws (makikomi) to salvage their entry.

Distancing between tori and uke

Unlike hip throws, there is space between the hips and torso of tori and uke in tai otoshi. You may hear this idea being called body management (tai sabaki), which can be different for different techniques. Good tai otoshi body management fits together with good weight distribution and posture.

 

Finally, the Kodokan video on tai otoshi:

 

Summary of Tuesday December 10th

December 11th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Warm-up exercises:

Ushiro goshi (rear hip throw)

Utsuri goshi (changing hip throw)

Tai otoshi (body drop) moving backwards

Tai otoshi moving sideways

Tai otoshi pulsing uke backwards before entry

 

Continuing on side sacrifice techniques (yoko sutemi waza, day 1, day 2), yoko wakare (side separation) and yoko gake (side hook or side prop) were demonstrated. Yoko wakare shown as a counter to de ashi barai (forward foot sweep) was also demonstrated.

Summary of Saturday December 7th

December 10th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (2 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing on the side sacrifice technique (yoko sutemi waza) theme from last class, yoko guruma (side wheel) was reviewed and yoko otoshi (side drop), uki waza (floating technique), and tani otoshi (valley drop) were demonstrated.

While these techniques may look similar, attention was paid to the mechanics of throw direction. What’s the difference? See the video below.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Yoko guruma (side wheel) is classified under yoko sutemi waza (side sacrifice technique). Here is the Kodokan demonstration (Youtube).

Ne-waza (ground technique):

Ryo-te jime (two hand choke) from belly-down back control was demonstrated (Kodokan example of other variations).

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