Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing from last class, o-uchi gari (major inner reap) is often finished by grabbing the reaped leg to keep chest and hip contact between tori and uke as tori pitches forward.  However in shiai (competition), leg grabs are now penalised.

A similar and shiai-legal variation is to place an “o-goshi” hand behind uke to block uke‘s hip so as to maintain contact between tori and uke while tori sacrifices forward balance. However, if uke steps out of the o-uchi gari, the “o-goshi” hand can then be used for a hip throw like o-goshi (major hip) or tsuri goshi (lifting hip).

Summary of Tuesday November 26th

November 28th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (1 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

O-uchi gari (major inner reap) variations were taught. The typical entry for o-uchi gari tends to be a straight forward entry, or “T-ing” up (article explanation). While T-ing is advantageous in allowing for a fast shuffle-step entry (tsugi ashi), if tori does not turn his/her chest back towards uke while finishing the throw (kake), then tori is vulnerable to counter techniques such as foot sweeps. A good summary on o-uchi gari can be found on the Difficult Way blog.

1. One alternative way of T-ing up is to use a circular movement to pull uke into the T-ing up position for o-uchi gari.

2. The second variation demonstrated was in the opposite stance situation (i.e. righty vs lefty, kenka yotsu). This variation, like the first, depends on uke‘s reaction to tori‘s pull. Tori pulls on uke‘s lapel and uke regains his/her balance by bringing his/her far leg forward. Tori then back-swings his/her near leg and drives off it while reaping uke‘s far leg.


Ne-waza (ground technique):

Three variations of ude garami (entangled armlock) were demonstrated. Specifically, ude garami from the side four-quarters hold (yoko shiho gatame) towards the head and towards the legs, as well as ude garami from guard were demonstrated.

Two variations of ude gatame (straight armlock) was also demonstrated, one from yoko shiho gatame and one from guard.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Soto makikomi, the outer wraparound throw, was demonstrated. Particular detail was paid to entering soto makikomi when uke is in the left stance (hidari shizentai), assuming tori is applying a right-handed soto makikomi. Moreover, soto makikomi should not be done by dropping straight down; rather, soto makikomi should extend pull uke‘s balance forward over the toes.

Here is the Kodokan video on soto makikomi.

Summary of Tuesday November 12th

November 13th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Several variations of uchi-mata (inner thigh) throw was demonstrated.

  1. “Hip version” uchi-mata (08 s); and example 1 and example 2
  2. “Leg version” uchi-mata
  3. Hopping or “ken kenuchi-mata (51 s)
  4. “Snap-down” uchi-mata (38 s)
  5. Uchi-mata counter to ko-soto gake (minor outer reap)

 

As a reminder, yellow belts should review the orange belt syllabus (pdf).

Summary of Saturday November 9th

November 11th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

The classical “hip-style” uchi-mata (inner thigh) throw was demonstrated. A good tutorial can be found here (Youtube).

 

As a reminder, yellow belts should review the orange belt syllabus (pdf).

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Hiza guruma (knee wheel) counter to ko-uchi gari (minor inside reap) was demonstrated. Here is a Kodokan video example for review!

Ne-waza (ground technique):

“Arm triangle”-style hadaka jime (naked choke) from guard, with the option of positional reversal from bottom to top and into kata gatame (shoulder hold).

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Harai tsurikomi ashi, the lifting pulling foot sweep.

Beginner technique recap

October 31st, 2013 | Posted by judo in Beginner | Class summary | News - (1 Comments)

This mid-semester technique recap is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Please only practise techniques under instructor supervision.


How to tie your belt and Pants, how do they work?— an instructional.

Warm-ups (taiso):

  • Shrimps (forward and reverse)
  • Mat drags
  • Partner-assisted rows
  • etc.

Break-fall techniques (ukemi):

  • Backward break-fall (ushiro ukemi)
  • Side break-fall (yoko ukemi)
  • Forward rolling break-fall (zenpo kaiten ukemi or mae mawari ukemi)

Throwing techniques (nage-waza):

  • O-soto gari (major outer reap)
  • O-uchi gari (major inner reap)
  • O-goshi (major hip throw)
  • Ippon seoi nage (one [arm] shoulder throw)
  • De-ashi barai (front foot sweep)

Ground techniques (ne-waza):

  • Hon kesa gatame (basic “scarf” hold, a pin or osaekomi-waza)
Full yellow belt syllabus (pdf).

Summary of Tuesday September 10th

September 11th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Tai otoshi (body drop) was demonstrated. There is a Kodokan video clip on tai otoshi, but it doesn’t go into the mechanics very well. However, an extremely detailed explanation and exposition of the common beginner errors to tai otoshi can be found in this article.

Some other videos on tai otoshi:

  1. Neil Adams on the power hand (tsurite), body management (tai sabaki), weight distribution, and finishing tai otoshi.
  2. Nicholas Gill (Canadian Olympic silver and bronze medallist) and Antoine Valois-Fortier (Canadian Olympic bronze medallist) on weight distribution, and opposite gripping and combination entries into tai otoshi.
  3. Some additional competition examples.
  4. Even more competition examples.
  5. Lee Won Hee and his favourite technique.

Summary of Saturday September 7th

September 7th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Ken ken osoto gari, or the hopping major outside reap, was taught. Here is an instructional video (German) from the normal gripping situation, as well examples from the opposite gripping situation (kenka yotsu): example 1, example 2, example 3.


Ne-waza (ground technique):

A rolling reversal from the turtle position was taught: video example.

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