Summary of Saturday June 1st

June 2nd, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (1 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Kodokan video on seoi-nage (shoulder throw), specifically ippon seoi nage (one hand shoulder throw). There were several ideas explored in this class, first of which is ayumi ashi (natural walking). Ayumi ashi is one of two ways of walking in judo, the other way being tsugi ashi (sequential walking or shuffling), and refers to walking by swinging one foot in front (or behind) of another. In particular, natural walking is used in the pre-arranged demonstration called nage-no-kata, wherein uke (receiver) steps in with an overhead strike towards tori (giver) while demonstrating seoi nage together. However, what was emphasized was not what was happening to the hands, but rather tori demonstrating seoi nage as uke‘s right leg swings forward (assuming both tori and uke are right-handed). Thus, attacking as uke‘s right leg swings forward is one step towards shifting drilling of seoi nage from a static position (uchikomi) to a more realistic moving drill (nagekomi). It is also important because kuzushi (unbalancing) is best applied to bring uke forward as his/her leg itself swings forward.

A related concept explored in class was tai sabaki (body movement). As “Best Judo” puts it (available partially online, in the UofT library or Toronto Public Library), tai sabaki is about moving one’s body into a position without compromising balance. For example, entering into the shoulder throw should not leave one falling backwards into their partner, counter to the desired direction of the throw. Thus, tori should be naturally walking with uke, and then tori executes mae-mawari sabaki (front-turn movement) to turn 180 degrees to throw uke as uke‘s leg swings forward (N.B. the description is better than the diagram in “Best Judo”). If this is performed correctly, tori should “fit” into uke and be able to load uke up (conceptually called tsukuri, part of the kuzushi-tsukuri-kake paradigm). What this means more simply is that when tori has turned to face opposite uke, tori‘s hips should be slightly blocking uke‘s legs. Incorrect body movement will result tori‘s hips either not blocking uke‘s legs enough, allowing uke to slip off the shoulder throw, or tori‘s hips shooting too far through thus allowing uke to slip off the far side.

The point of these terms is not to confuse with foreign Japanese words, as they can be easily communicated in English. For example, natural walking is much more intuitive than ayumi ashi, and many judoka perform these concepts without ever being taught. Rather, the point of this summary is to provide food-for-thought towards performing a shoulder throw without tripping over one’s feet. There are other refinements that can improve shoulder throws, but the main emphasis of Saturday’s class is timing forward unbalancing during natural walking, and correct body positioning.


Ne-waza (ground technique):

These are picture and text instructionals. Pins are often under appreciated, and many details exist to add to the positional dominance of a pin or allow transition to a strangulation or armlock technique. However, what was emphasized in class was a pin-flow from hon kesa, to kuzure kesa, to mune gatame.

  1. Hon kesa gatame (basic “scarf” hold)
  2. Kuzure kesa gatame (broken or modified “scarf” hold)
  3. Mune gatame (chest hold, a name not recognised by the Kodokan, which will refer to it as a modified side hold or yoko shiho gatame)

 

Summary of Tuesday May 28th

May 30th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Kodokan video on seoi-nage (shoulder throw).

Summary of Saturday May 25th

May 27th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Review of kosoto gari, with an added application of kosoto gari as a counter to forward throws like seoi nage. Furthermore, kosoto gake (small outside hook) was demonstrated. The differences between various similar leg techniques are also reviewed in the Kodokan video in the link above.

Summary of Tuesday May 21st

May 22nd, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (1 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Kodokan video on some shoulder throw variations:

  1. Morote seoi-nage (two hand shoulder throw)
  2. Ippon seoi-nage (one [hand] shoulder throw)

Ne-waza (ground technique):

Reversals, turnovers, and sweeps are one of the most important basics.

  1. Pendulum sweep (AKA flower sweep, windmill sweep)
  2. Scissor sweep
  3. Butterfly sweep: clip by Nicholas Gill, Canadian Olympic silver medallist; or Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki; or alternatively a picture/text instructional.

Summary of Saturday May 18th

May 20th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Review of hane goshi.


Ne-waza (ground techique):

Review of arm drag series. Additionally, an arm drag setup to an arm triangle choke (AKA head-and-arm choke, kata gatame) was shown, although it was demonstrated slightly differently by sensei-Comrie.

Summary of Tuesday May 14th

May 17th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Short summary today even though there was more covered on Tuesday. As always, these summaries are not meant to be comprehensive, and techniques should always be practised safely under supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Tomoe-nage was the main throw demonstrated, and it is usually idiomatically translated as the circle throw or the whirling throw. In actuality, it refers to a whirling symbol that is common in many Asian cultures, and its descriptive appropriateness should be self-evident. Without further ado, tomoe-nage is demonstrated in this Kodokan video. It’s important to note that there are many variations of tomoe-nage besides those demonstrated in the video. More generally, tomoe-nage is an advanced and difficult throw because of its “sacrificial” implementation, which requires tori to fully commit and give up his/her balance and posture. Accordingly, tomoe-nage is classified with various other throws (as in the video) as ma-sutemi waza, or forward sacrifice techniques.

Summary of Saturday May 11th

May 12th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Review of hane goshi.


Ne-waza (ground techique):

  1. “Hugging” turnover with leg hooks from turtle position (example 1, example 2, example 3)
  2. Kuzure kesa gatame (broken “scarf” hold) escape (example 1, example 2)

Summary of Tuesday May 6th

May 8th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (1 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Ko soto gari (small outside reap) was introduced on Tuesday. For reference, watch this Kodokan video on kosoto gari. Note the emphasis of the “clipping” or reaping in the direction of uke‘s toes. Later in the video, there is also an important discussion on how kosoto gari differs from other ashi-waza (leg techniques) like de ashi barai (forward foot/leg sweep) and kosoto gake (not discussed). Note the difference between the direction and mechanics of the leg action between kosoto gari and deashi barai, as well as the difference in attack timing as uke‘s weight shifts between legs.

For additional food for thought, read this primer on kosoto gari by the author of The Difficult Way.


Ne-waza (ground technique):

Bernard’s side triangle-like turnover from turtle position.

While not yet officially announced by Hart House, the administration has decided to defer the summer access fee until next summer. If the access fee was a barrier to club participation, hopefully this news will change that!


Today’s technique was a revisit to hane goshi ((跳ね腰), the springing hip throw. It’s one of the more difficult hip throws, and apocryphal history claims that it was invented by an injured judoka who had trouble performing uchi mata (内股), the inner thigh throw. Regardless, here is a video made by the Kodokan on hane goshi. Demonstrated in this video are:

  1. A chasing entry into hane goshi.
  2. A sideways entry into hane goshi (not discussed in class).
  3. A more static entry into hane goshi.
  4. An analysis as to the differences between hane goshi, harai goshi (払腰, sweeping hip throw), uchi mata.
Further food for thought can be found in this video, which emphasizes the hierarchical importance of hip action over the leg follow-through. In essence, the follow-through leg action mainly guides the throw rather than being the main driver of leverage; an analogy can be made with swinging a baseball bat or tennis racket. The leg action also helps create a flat plane in conjunction with the hip and chest to bear the load of uke. The actual main leverage quite literally comes from a “springing” action to load uke onto the hip (and legs and chest).

Summary of Tuesday April 23rd

April 25th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques presented in these videos may not necessarily be identical to what was taught in class.


  1. Bridging reversal from hon kesa gatame (basic “scarf” hold)
  2. Rolling reversal from turtle position
  3. Ushiro kesa gatame (rear “scarf” hold)
    N.B. The Kodokan only officially recognises (hon) kesa gatame and kuzure kesa gatame (broken “scarf” hold), and this variation would be officially categorised as kuzure. There is also one other variation also (non-officially) referred to as ushiro kesa gatame.
  4. Arm drag set-up to:

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