Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Morote gari, the two-handed reap, was demonstrated. It is often known as a double leg takedown in other combat sports, although technically single leg takedowns are also classified as morote gari.

Kibisu gaeshi, the ankle reversal, was also demonstrated. This is often known as an ankle pick in other combat sports.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Tai otoshi (body drop) is classified as a te-waza or hand technique. Consequently, applying an effective tai otoshi can be challenging if one applies mechanical principles from other forward throws such as hip throws (koshi waza). A good written instructional on common tai otoshi errors can be found on this blog, which touches on several topics covered in class:

Weight distribution

Nicholas Gill, Canadian Olympic medallist, demonstrates the difference between good and bad weight distribution between legs, in terms of spacing between tori and uke and concomitant ability to apply pushing power with the arms.

Posture

The posture for tai otoshi is fairly straight upwards. A bent posture tends to throw weight distribution off and/or disrupt arm action, which sometimes leads people to try wraparound sacrifice throws (makikomi) to salvage their entry.

Distancing between tori and uke

Unlike hip throws, there is space between the hips and torso of tori and uke in tai otoshi. You may hear this idea being called body management (tai sabaki), which can be different for different techniques. Good tai otoshi body management fits together with good weight distribution and posture.

 

Finally, the Kodokan video on tai otoshi:

 

Summary of Tuesday December 10th

December 11th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Warm-up exercises:

Ushiro goshi (rear hip throw)

Utsuri goshi (changing hip throw)

Tai otoshi (body drop) moving backwards

Tai otoshi moving sideways

Tai otoshi pulsing uke backwards before entry

 

Continuing on side sacrifice techniques (yoko sutemi waza, day 1, day 2), yoko wakare (side separation) and yoko gake (side hook or side prop) were demonstrated. Yoko wakare shown as a counter to de ashi barai (forward foot sweep) was also demonstrated.

Summary of Saturday December 7th

December 10th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (2 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing on the side sacrifice technique (yoko sutemi waza) theme from last class, yoko guruma (side wheel) was reviewed and yoko otoshi (side drop), uki waza (floating technique), and tani otoshi (valley drop) were demonstrated.

While these techniques may look similar, attention was paid to the mechanics of throw direction. What’s the difference? See the video below.

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Yoko guruma (side wheel) is classified under yoko sutemi waza (side sacrifice technique). Here is the Kodokan demonstration (Youtube).

Ne-waza (ground technique):

Ryo-te jime (two hand choke) from belly-down back control was demonstrated (Kodokan example of other variations).

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Continuing from last class, o-uchi gari (major inner reap) is often finished by grabbing the reaped leg to keep chest and hip contact between tori and uke as tori pitches forward.  However in shiai (competition), leg grabs are now penalised.

A similar and shiai-legal variation is to place an “o-goshi” hand behind uke to block uke‘s hip so as to maintain contact between tori and uke while tori sacrifices forward balance. However, if uke steps out of the o-uchi gari, the “o-goshi” hand can then be used for a hip throw like o-goshi (major hip) or tsuri goshi (lifting hip).

Summary of Tuesday November 26th

November 28th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (1 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

O-uchi gari (major inner reap) variations were taught. The typical entry for o-uchi gari tends to be a straight forward entry, or “T-ing” up (article explanation). While T-ing is advantageous in allowing for a fast shuffle-step entry (tsugi ashi), if tori does not turn his/her chest back towards uke while finishing the throw (kake), then tori is vulnerable to counter techniques such as foot sweeps. A good summary on o-uchi gari can be found on the Difficult Way blog.

1. One alternative way of T-ing up is to use a circular movement to pull uke into the T-ing up position for o-uchi gari.

2. The second variation demonstrated was in the opposite stance situation (i.e. righty vs lefty, kenka yotsu). This variation, like the first, depends on uke‘s reaction to tori‘s pull. Tori pulls on uke‘s lapel and uke regains his/her balance by bringing his/her far leg forward. Tori then back-swings his/her near leg and drives off it while reaping uke‘s far leg.


Ne-waza (ground technique):

Three variations of ude garami (entangled armlock) were demonstrated. Specifically, ude garami from the side four-quarters hold (yoko shiho gatame) towards the head and towards the legs, as well as ude garami from guard were demonstrated.

Two variations of ude gatame (straight armlock) was also demonstrated, one from yoko shiho gatame and one from guard.

Joint Class and Annual General Meeting!

November 22nd, 2013 | Posted by judo in News - (0 Comments)
Are you a social caterpillar? Come this Saturday to the events below and become a beautiful judo butterfly! Or beautiful judo moth, your choice!

Joint Class Saturday Nov. 23, 12-2 PM

There will be a joint Beginner/Intermediate class next Saturday (Nov. 23rd). This will occur between 12 and 2 PM approximately. As always, please arrive before 12 PM so as to promptly put down the mats and start the class. As a further reminder for the joint class, and this is equally applicable to novice and experienced judo practitioners, judo should be practised safely and within the spirit of “mutual welfare and benefit” and “maximum efficiency”. This is especially important for activities like randori (free sparring) to which the Beginners class is only now being introduced.

Annual General Meeting Nov. 23, 4 PM onwards

The Annual General Meeting (AGM) for the UofT Judo Club will occur on Saturday November 23rd after the Saturday class, from 4 PM onwards. The purpose of the AGM is to elect the club executive as well as to ratify and amend the club constitution (pdf). The AGM is a potluck affair, which means attendees should bring some sort of food or beverage item to share! After club business and food grazing, there will also be some sort of video entertainment.
If you’re the type of person to get easily lost, there will be expedition group that will walk to the AGM after the joint class (~ 3 PM).

AGM location: 75 Dalhousie St (close to Dundas and Queen stations)

AGM time: Saturday November 23rd, 4 PM onwards

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Soto makikomi, the outer wraparound throw, was demonstrated. Particular detail was paid to entering soto makikomi when uke is in the left stance (hidari shizentai), assuming tori is applying a right-handed soto makikomi. Moreover, soto makikomi should not be done by dropping straight down; rather, soto makikomi should extend pull uke‘s balance forward over the toes.

Here is the Kodokan video on soto makikomi.

Summary of Tuesday November 12th

November 13th, 2013 | Posted by judo in Class summary | Intermediate | News - (0 Comments)

Please note that the techniques summarised below may not necessarily be identical or capture all that was taught in class. This summary is for supplemental purposes only and does not replace live instruction. Techniques should only be practised under instructor supervision.


Nage-waza (throwing technique):

Several variations of uchi-mata (inner thigh) throw was demonstrated.

  1. “Hip version” uchi-mata (08 s); and example 1 and example 2
  2. “Leg version” uchi-mata
  3. Hopping or “ken kenuchi-mata (51 s)
  4. “Snap-down” uchi-mata (38 s)
  5. Uchi-mata counter to ko-soto gake (minor outer reap)

 

As a reminder, yellow belts should review the orange belt syllabus (pdf).

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